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 Post subject: The Art of Deployment
PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 4:08 pm 
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Yet another article that I wrote for my local gaming group, which I'll share here as well - again, written with no particular army in mind. Enjoy!

The Art of Deployment

Games of Warhammer are won and lost in the deployment phase.

It may seem like a silly statement, considering the battle hasn't even been fought yet, but it is a simple truth. The decisions you make during this phase of the game not only dictate the pace of the game, but also the outcome.

Let's boil the game down into the simplest form we can to illustrate my point. You have a unit of Empire swordsmen and a Dwarf Grudge thrower. The Empire swordsmen have movement 4, meaning a march move of 8. Given the 24" distance between deployment zones, this means that the empire can be in charge range of that Grudge thrower on turn 3, allowing the stone thrower two shots on the unit - odds are they make it to that artillery.

Now deploy the units differently, one on each corner of the board. Instead of 24" to travel, the swordsmen now have close to 100" to travel before they reach the artillery. There is almost no chance that they make it to their target alive.

It may be an extremely simple example, but it illustrates the point - given that our units have fixed movement and ranges, where you deploy them largely dictates where you can apply their force.

Knowing this, it now becomes vitally important that you a) have a strategy for deploying your troops and b) adapt that strategy based on your opponent’s deployment choices.

1) Your best units are like having a strong hand in poker

Professional poker players, upon being dealt a good hand, don’t slap their cards down on the table and exclaim “Check this out!” – It’s more tactically advantageous for them to pretend like they have nothing and try to draw out their opponent’s bets.

Similarly in the deployment phase, think of your strongest units like they’re full houses. You want to get as much information as you can before you make a choice about where to put them down. If you drop a 600 point unit as your first drop, your opponent can react to that drop by implementing one of their redirection or absorbing strategies.

Small distraction units are perfect for this task; by deploying these units you buy time and give away nothing. I recently played a game versus Warriors of Chaos, where the first four units on the board were 10 strong units of marauders. These units were approximately 50 points each – 200 points all in – and for that cost, he ensured that he had the tactical advantage in terms of deployment. Using those 4 drops, he effectively exhausted my low point units and forced me to reveal my hand first.

2) Stop thinking about units and think about the big picture

Even armies that employ “death-star” tactics cannot earn enough points to win a game against a wily opponent without thinking about their strategy as a whole. We’ve all fallen into the trap of deploying our armies with the intention of “fighting this unit against that unit”. Think back, though, at your games. How many of these games actually end up with the battles you expect?

It usually doesn’t happen how you expect it; the game rewards strategies like flanking and rear attacks too much for you to believe that your opponent will just run his troops at you head on.

Instead approach the game with a general strategy in mind. Your strategy should suit your army’s play-style – I often use my High Elves in a refused flank strategy or my Skaven with a hard center/heavy flank strategy. Every army has something it does well, but the point is that your deployment should augment what your army can accomplish. A lot can be ascertained just by thinking about what your, and your opponent's army does well.

Approach the deployment phase with a common goal. If you just put down units without any thought, a canny opponent will pick you apart piece by piece.

3) Know your opponent and react accordingly

What does your opponent do well?

This is where it pays to do some research and know what each army is capable of bringing to the table.

Using this knowledge, you can begin to make certain assumptions about what is going to happen on their side of the board before a single unit is placed. For example, if you’re facing Skaven or Empire, you can put money on the fact that you’re going to be dealing with big units. Large units require a great deal of real estate on the board, which limits the positions that they can put them down and still manage to accommodate the rest of their army. Use this to your advantage; think in terms of what your opponent *has* to do and what he’s probably going to do. This will give you a tactical advantage. Using the example just mentioned, there are probably only three spots on the board he can drop that unit, and out of those only 2 are reasonable – how are you going to deal with it?

I mentioned a battle against Warriors of Chaos in the last section. In this battle, my opponent wrote what I would call an excellent list – well rounded and with a strong shooting and magic phase, including a level 4 sorcerer and 2 hellcannons, with heavy focus on steadfast blocks of marauders.

I, as the Skaven player, had a disadvantage in close combat, but a strength in numbers and comparable shooting.
For all intents and purposes, my opponent had a stronger list. What ended up costing him the game, ultimately, was allowing the skaven to encircle him and utilize their numbers to their advantage.

When faced with superior numbers, an elite army must do whatever they can to mitigate their opponent’s numbers. Refused flanks are perfect for this, essentially causing a significant portion of the opponent’s army to be tripping over itself.

Similarly horde armies must do what they can to utilize their additional units to out-position the opponent in order to reduce their effectiveness in combat and win a war of attrition.

4) Deploy to force an opponent’s move

Think about the game of chess; a move that advances your strategic goal and forces your opponent to make a move is strategically more advantageous than one that simply furthers your own objective.

This one is a little more nuanced to use than the others, but it can really get you a leg up if used effectively. When done well, this strategy essentially allows you to in a way deploy your opponents army for them.

Let’s take a unit of Chosen Warriors for example. As one of the hardest units in the game, the threat of these guys being deployed is a very real risk to your opponents. Why not use this to your tactical advantage? Your opponent will certainly see your unit of badass mother-F’ers and immediately allocate distraction/absorption units (ahem *slaves* ahem). So knowing this, use it to your advantage; deploy your chosen, then drop your unit of fast cavalry or spawn immediately beside it the turn after, allowing them to deal with the distraction threat, and allowing you to walk unimpeded into their battle line. You use the psychological effect of a unit to force your opponent's hand.



I don’t think I’d be out of line in saying that half of the game happens in the deployment phase. It dictates when, where and how you apply your force. It dictates when, where and how your opponent applies his force. It rewards those who read their opponent and it punishes those that don’t. It creates opportunities and likewise eliminates them.

End Transmission

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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 5:09 pm 
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Great article, good insight too! =D>

But I can't agree with the emphasis you seem to be putting on the deployment itself. Most troops in 8th edtion are now more mobile than they ever were (coming form a guy who's been playing since 4th ed. :lol: ). Swift reforms, enemy sighted, terrain not as penalizing, inspiring presence and better charge range are all factors that can now help with post deployment "corrections".


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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 7:09 pm 
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Kovalev wrote:
But I can't agree with the emphasis you seem to be putting on the deployment itself. Most troops in 8th edtion are now more mobile than they ever were (coming form a guy who's been playing since 4th ed. :lol: ). Swift reforms, enemy sighted, terrain not as penalizing, inspiring presence and better charge range are all factors that can now help with post deployment "corrections".


Again, nice post. Kovalev, you can make corrections at a later point but if you F it up to begin with you don't make it any easier for yourself!

I've also put a link to Seredain's treatise on deployment, another good read.
http://www.ulthuan.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=67&t=33584&hilit=seredain+deployment&start=60


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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 7:41 pm 
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Ofcourse there are lots of other stuff you can do too.

forexample placing that all important unit first actually lets you dictate where you want the fight to be.

and then you can fake an all important unit, the enemy might think that its an important unit but its not.


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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 8:28 pm 
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@John Rainbow: agreed. I'm not saying that deployment can always be fixed. I just think that stating:

Quote:
Games of Warhammer are won and lost in the deployment phase.


Quote:
half of the game happens in the deployment phase


Is over the top.


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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 9:45 pm 
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@ Kovalev

Perhaps the wording on that first statement was a bit ambiguous; I didn't mean to imply that *every* game was decided in deployment, but rather that many are. I'll give you a few examples from our very own battle report forum:

First, of course, is one of my own battles that I recently put up:

http://www.ulthuan.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=51&t=35362

In this battle, during the deployment phase, I dropped a unit of Dragon Princes on the far right flank to feign a refused right flank. As a reaction, he placed a big block of marauders on that flank, and subsequently I went hard left. Had these marauders been towards the middle, this fight would have been a different story entirely. I used magic and fleeing charges to prevent him from reaching the main combat where they really could have made a difference.

Second is a great battle between Curu Olannon's cavalry based army against a skaven player.

http://www.ulthuan.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=67&t=35318&p=715698#p715698

Take a look at how the skaven player ends up tripping over himself to make up for a couple of deployment blunders. Imagine, for example, that that doomwheel was on the opposite flank, or that his grey seer was deployed more aggressively to get his nasty plague spells in range.

Curu does a great job of exploiting these errors and punching through a flank quickly and efficiently due to the advantage he gained in the deployment phase.

Finally, look at the fight that was already posted above between Seredain and his lizardman opponent (or pretty much any of Seredain's reports :P) - the entire premise of his army is to deploy his army so that he can punch through a flank similar to Curu's match above. His units are deployed very intentionally, and he does a great job of explaining his reasoning in that article.

I do, however, completely agree that 8th edition has opened up more possibilities for redeployment once the game has started. This can even be factored in to your deployment.

Improved as it may be, though, the movement of units are still finite, so I'm going to hold fast to the original premise of the article :)

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Check out my Army Blog for tactics, battle reports and general ramblings: Brewmaster D's Coven of Light Army List Blog
The Art of Deployment
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Last edited by Brewmaster_D on Thu May 19, 2011 7:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 10:39 pm 
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Nice article, definitely a good read.

As a High Elf player, I really need to know what a refused flank is before I play my first game.

Can anyone help me with that? :oops:


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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 10:53 pm 
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Sure. The idea is that you heavily weight one flank with the majority of your forces and gain local superiority there. This works especially well when you are playing against a horde-style army and they are practically forced to deploy across the whole board. You can hold up one flank of their army while you destroy the other half with the whole of your army.

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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 3:28 am 
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grantmepower wrote:
Sure. The idea is that you heavily weight one flank with the majority of your forces and gain local superiority there. This works especially well when you are playing against a horde-style army and they are practically forced to deploy across the whole board. You can hold up one flank of their army while you destroy the other half with the whole of your army.


You can achieve this same thing with a few key units/characters. Awhile back I posted a build for a Prince that has the Crown of Command, 4+ ward with re-roll to armor saves, and the Dragon Helm. Give him regular armor and a great weapon, and a shield if you want him to have an even better armor save against ranged attacks. This guy is all but unkillable. I held up a horde of Blood letters with him, long enough to take out other stuff and then focus my forces on the horde. It was biblical! Nice holding up a whole flank with just one character.

Also, you have to be very careful when implementing the "refuse flank" strategy. They can either just weigh down the opposite side and try to do the same thing to you, or they can try to match your units on your heavy flank and in some cases can just have your number. WoC can match our units pretty well, so sometimes it can be hard to do this against them imo.


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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 4:02 pm 
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ajpieri wrote:
This guy is all but unkillable

Just remember that you can still be beaten on combat res (esp. by hordes) and chased down even if you can't be killed.


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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 5:26 pm 
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YoungKing - the best way to understand a proper refused flank strategy is to see one being used.

Brewmaster_D - here is the link to the Skaven report (yours doesn't work): viewtopic.php?f=67&t=35318&p=715698#p715698

I almost always play a refused flank. With my cavalry hammers it's easy to utilize their movement to fully capitalize on this. Sometimes the strong and fast flank just wade through whatever comes (see my game vs Kholek and Seredain's vs Lizardmen), other times it just ruins your opponents strong flank (see my game vs Skaven). Most of the time though, it renders at least one opposing strong unit useless until it's too late.

How does one achieve it?

By having weak, multiple, un-committing drops. Examples: Eagles, Repeater, small units of Archers.

How do you take advantage of it?

Hard to put into words, examples are best. See how useless the Doomwheel was in the Skaven fight, or the Trolls in my recent WoC match: they failed to make an impact until it was too late. Having Eagles allow you to further capitalize on this - by either blocking a flank as you're turning your strong units around, or by slowing his turning flank by stopping 1" in front of them.

Excellent article by the way - deployment is key, especially for us. If you know how to deploy and utilize any advantages gained you indeed have won half the battle ;)

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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 8:43 pm 
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Basically, what I normaly do:

Field the units that can be deployed anywhere to be effective first.
Eagles are manoeuverable enough to be deployed almost anywhere, RBT can more or less deployed anywhere, as they have such a long range, and if you take archers in small units, this is also true for them.

Hard hitting cavalary units go to the flank and a reliable unit goes to the center (large spears, phoenix guard or to a lesser degree white lions).

By this time the enemy should have had enough deployment drops so you can see what is going on on the opponents table side. Now I load up everything else that is left on one flank.

This does not always work, as too much terrain can serioulsy mess this up, but generaly it results in an army that only has one flank, which is guarded by a quite reliable and probably steadfast unit, while the rest of the army dashes forward onto the enemies.

Reforming because you made a fault during deployment is possible, but losing the ability to march and standing at a table edge can be extremly dangerous if you face a heavy shooting list, especially if your BSB is mounted and and moves farther away and away every turn.


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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 10:05 pm 
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Quote:
Eagles are manoeuverable enough to be deployed almost anywhere, RBT can more or less deployed anywhere, as they have such a long range, and if you take archers in small units, this is also true for them.


It's one thing that I don't really touch on in the article that I should have actually: the concept of re-deployability

The eagles are a great example of a unit that is easily re-deployed. With 20" flying movment, they are able to reposition themselves quickly and easily after deployment. Conversely, the marauders in my battle report had very little ability to re-deploy. Putting them on the flank ensured that for the rest of the game, they would struggle to get back into the fight.

Quote:
As a High Elf player, I really need to know what a refused flank is before I play my first game.


The other guys here have done a good job of explaining what it is. I'll just add a tiny bit: High Elves win most 1v1 fights. Refused flanks, as detailed above, are all about breaking down the game into a series of smaller, favourable battles as opposed to one giant melee. This is one of the key advantages of cavalry - their movment lets them get to where they need to be quickly and efficiently.

I wrote this article when I watched some of the newer players in our gaming group treat the deployment phase as an obstacle to the game. "Get deployment done so we can start". My hope is that by sharing it, some new players read it and shift their thinking a bit.

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Check out my Army Blog for tactics, battle reports and general ramblings: Brewmaster D's Coven of Light Army List Blog
The Art of Deployment
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PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 2:15 pm 
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I think the article is pretty decent, but if the objective is to teach new players, I think you need to introduce some basics before you start with the more advanced stuff. For example:

Brewmaster_D wrote:
We’ve all fallen into the trap of deploying our armies with the intention of “fighting this unit against that unit”. Think back, though, at your games. How many of these games actually end up with the battles you expect?


For many completely new players, they haven't even yet gotten to the stage of thinking about "fighting this unit against that unit". You need to teach them about that basic concept before telling them that there is more to it. You can't teach someone quantum mechanics before they master newtonian. Anyone who says "Get deployment done so we can start" probably isn't even thinking about creating good matchups - they are just putting units on the board.

I observed something like this when I was first teaching my wife how to play. She didn't know what was good against what, so she would ask me where she should put things. If I didn't give her any information, she would just put them wherever looked nice. It was only once she understood that dark riders were good against warmachines and cold one knights were best used to charge something dangerous, that she was able to really deploy with good reasons.

If you added something about the basics of deployment it would probably be better for the newbies. Believe it or not, there are a lot of players who don't yet know that winning happens by creating good matchups, and that the best matchups are ganging up multiple units against one.

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Close buts its a bit more Operation Chargeblerghvomitvomiteateat ooolook I grew an extra head


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PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 6:30 pm 
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Additionaly, one should perhaps add, that it may hold true for certain armies like high elfs that you always should have the great picture and a general stratagy in mind, there are other armies that in addition have to deploy by additional rules.

Skaven deployment f.e. goes by completly other rules than HE deployment, as those are completly different armies.
F.E.: Skaven have an indefinite number of giant rats units (23 points) that can act as hard cover against BF-shooting. However, they will cause panic in almost anything if they are shot at, so you have to keep in mind you need a bsb and/or a general in range. If not, you have to keep 6 inches away from those rats, as otherwise, this can lead to mass panic between the giant rats units and anything that does not have enough SiN-bonus.
DWs shoot as the nearest unit, if you field them beside your rat ogres or your warpflamethrower, byebye. They also have random 3d6 movement and are only real useable against small units. If you find your DW facing 3 units of 40-men-size, then it will be quite useless. When you deploy it in the front of a unit of DP, you will force them to completly go into another direction or they will face one or two rounds of zaaaap, which is most of the time enough to kill off a regiment of the most elite cavalery. And that is not even mentioning how problematic it gets if you have to field multiple units in horde formation....


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PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2012 6:22 pm 
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Thanks this is really helpful,
I'm one of those "newbies" and I found it fine, do you guys think that sword masters could make a good bluff unit? Force them to deploy against the sm then maybe use dos to crush them in the other side...

One thing which I thought would come up but hasn't is the reavers, I find their vanguard move brilliant, use that to set up and early flank charge if the opponent sucks or if they are decent just harass them with bow fire and and threaten their war machines

Then they are forced to close a that flank which is awesome for stalling their advance, then flank charge with says an eagle and munch their other flank with the dp makes them sweat over the decisions.

Any advice? I have only played a few small games and I really find the reavers useful, they are a real spanner in the works.

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PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2012 9:17 pm 
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Bluff units should be "redeployable" which means that whereever you place them, they can get their job done. The crux with this is, the more "redeployable" a unit gets, the less of a bluff they are. Nobody will put down a 700 points ogre deathstar to face 2 eagles that will be on the other end of the table by round 2. I would not advise you to take SMs as a decoy, as they need to get into CC as soon as possible. Deploying them somewhere far away from the action buys the enemy much time to shoot at them, and they cannot help out in CC as quickly as if they were deployed nearer to the rest of your army. So a large unit of SMs will work perfectly for a bluff unit, but if the enemy is deceived and counters it with a unit of repeater crossbows (for example), than you will have perhaps gained less than you lost.

Reavers are a very hard unit to master. Especially if you play small games and have only limited experience. To say it very simplistic: Everything that reavers can do, an eagle can do better and for less points.
Many of this questions smell like Island of blood, and I would really advise you to get some games under your belt befor you start fielding reavers. In many cases you will be better off if you just pretend them to be silver helms or dragon princes.


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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 10:09 am 
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Yup I have iob and I will get dragon princes soon for their killing power, I chose iob for the units, I don't like wl and og that much and the reavers are just useful but I won't get more, as I said I use them as a spanner in the works. But yes I think the sm are to pricey and flimsy for decoys now that you point it out.

That is the biggest issue with the iob it packs a hectic punch but you need to play really well to not lose any troops and with so few the army is a paper thin glass cannon, no room for any error

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if you are drowning out there as a beginner, I hope this helps.


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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 1:01 pm 
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Arch Mage wrote:
That is the biggest issue with the iob it packs a hectic punch but you need to play really well to not lose any troops and with so few the army is a paper thin glass cannon, no room for any error


Bad news: I think most people here will agree with me that this does not change much if you get more models. Imho, HE are an army that is hard to play and very hard to master (well... compared to skaven), the only easy thing you can do with those guys is redirecting and getting massacred in 3 turns.


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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 3:18 pm 
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Actually no, I have never lost against the skaven, that said the opposing player isn't great since I taught him (fairly, but I'm not that learned) but when I played a three way game against skaven and WE battalion I lost badly, for the reasons above.

But I hadn't bolstered the army with magic items so it was 600 vs. 750s and we were unsure of the rules (the warlock engineer got four spells for some bizarre reason) and I chose death to try it out.

So if I get some core and more specials I can field a decent army. Battalion maybe.

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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 7:39 pm 
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It was interesting to read, but don't think it really covered enough or went into enough depth. I agree that for the most part, half the game is the deployment phase. Far too often I've read warseer battle reports from the "experts" who advocate taking 3 combat hordes and brute forcing your way through the game. And then they never have a good explanation for why they lost. Anyways, I've got more to add but I think its more pertinent in your other thread about army list writing.

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